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brain_cozy
21 April 2006 @ 06:44 am
This is a fun little thing. 24 out of 51 (counting DC). Not bad, considering my age. I've still got time :)



create your own visited states map
or check out these Google Hacks.
 
 
brain_cozy
29 March 2006 @ 01:13 am
Bwahahahaha...

I have triumphed over the limitations of my computer! (yes, I'm very proud of myself)

I have a lovely little note-taking app called VoodooPad. One of the nice features that promted me to pay for the full version rather that stick with the free 'lite' was a service in the services menu 'send to VoodooPad'. Unfortunately, the app in which I'm most likely to want to use this feature is Firefox, which does not support services. :(

So I thought, maybe I can set up a trigger in QuickSilver to do it, but, of course, you can't directly send a selection to QS from FF. Then I though to take the latest item from the clipboard and send it to the service. This works, but it has several limitations. It only works on docs that are already open, it appends when I'd prefer it to prepend, and, worst of all, if you have more than one doc open, it pops up a little dialog and you have to choose a doc and hit 'ok'.

This pretty much defeats the purpose of having a trigger in the first place, which is simplicity.

So then I wanted to alter the service. This turns out to be massively difficult, if not impossible. So I wanted to write a new service. This would require writing it in Cocoa, which I don't know, and, I confess, I didn't entirely understand what to do with the prog even if I wrote it. Scratch the services menu options.

So then I thought about AppleScript. QS can run AS's. But I don't know anything about AS. There was a little script on the VdP website, but it did stuff I didn't want it to do and required particular kinds of input, which rendered it useless for my purposes. When I tried to alter it, I either broke it or it didn't actually work in the first place. (I probably broke it) It was meant to take input from the QS text field and add it to a particular pad:page. But I wanted to take a selection or a clipboard item and send it. So I had to write my own. I found a little script that changes clipboard text to plain text. This showed me how to access the clipboard and turn it into a string. Then it was trial and error to get the right doc open and the right page selected and then format the input properly.

But finally, it worked!!

Of course, it took me 6 hours to do. But now I know a lot more about AS than I ever have before. And I can just hit ⌘-c then ⌥⌘-v and the date, time, and text is added to the top of the Inbox page of my Notes document. When I'm done, I can switch over to VdP and distribute the stuff to the proper pages. The only bad part is that it's not added with the default style. Oh well, that's pretty easy to fix. When I copy it to the right page, I can just use the 'paste with current style' option. All in all, though, it's damn cool. And I'm extremely proud of myself for figuring it out.

 
 
brain_cozy
19 March 2006 @ 05:28 pm
got wedges?
Initiative for Cuneiform Encoding


Bwahahahaha....


I love it! This is now the Best. Thing. Ever. (only just beating out the PersonalBrain from my last post)

 
 
brain_cozy
17 March 2006 @ 09:20 am
!!!  
O_O

whoa

You must watch this shockwave movie. It is the Best. Thing. Ever.

I'm so disappointed that I can't have this :(

(Pssst, make a Mac version!)

 
 
Current Mood: amusedamused
 
 
brain_cozy
17 March 2006 @ 09:13 am
Happy St. Patrick's Day.

Anyway, I've been continuing on with my software downloading/evaluating frenzy. Specifically, I've been trying to find 'mind mapping' software. The concept is courtesy and © Tony Buzan, who wrote a book about mind maps in the 1960's. It's a relatively simple concept, but still a great idea. Instead of outlining or just freeform writing out ideas, you put them into a web shape with the 'top' or 'parent' idea in the center and the 'children' ranging around it. This can, of course, be done on paper (yeah, right), but since they're evolving documents, you want to be able to move things around and even refocus the map if necessary, so a modular, adaptable format is better. Post-its on a board would work, but you could kill a lot of trees that way, one little yellow slip at a time :) So a software implementation would be ideal; something in the drawing-flowcharting family, but with the ability to link to documents, images, and urls, so you can attach inspiration, research, and completed and wip products.

Apparently other people think this is a good idea, too, because there are apps. But they cost from 50 - *250* dollars! Of course I realize that this is not unusual for software. I guess four days of looking at free- and shareware (not to mention a student budget) has warped my perspective.

So I have absolutely no intention of spending $250 on software right now. The $50 range might be doable, if the app is really good and does exactly what I want it to do. So far, I haven't found it. It doesn't help that I'm a devoted Mac user and most of these programs (well, most of all programs) are for Windows.

Sigh.

On the other hand, it's given me a project that's feasible at my current level of energy/brain power/attention span, so it's good for me. And, in the process of looking, I found one of the absolute coolest apps ever. It's called Quicksilver and, now that I have found it, it seems like every site and blog about Macs mentions it and how amazingly useful it is. One of the blogs I read about it called it a CLI in a GUI. It searches your hard drive, allows you to select applications, documents, bookmarks, etc. and perform actions on them (e.g. open, open with, search for, move). But it also has option modules that you can install that let it use applescripts, control iTunes, do web searches and you can select actions or created custom combinations of actions and assign them to hotkeys. So now I can hit ctr-option-cmd-g and Firefox pops up with Google. From anywhere, Firefox doesn't even have to be open for the hotkeys to work.

These things are all great, but the best feature I've found so far was inspired by del.icio.us tagging. Quicksilver has commands to insert tags into the Spotlights comments field that every file in Mac OS X has. It prepends an tag identifier, I chose [, to separate the tags from any other comments and maintains a catalog of all the tags you use. You can then call up this catalog, choose a tag, and a smart folder will pop up with every item that has that tag. Brilliant! And you can select a bunch of files in the Finder and use cmd-Esc to load them into Quicksilver to do batch tag assignments.

Wow. I sound just as infatuated with this app as everyone else I've read. Maybe there's something in the code...

 
 
 
brain_cozy
14 March 2006 @ 10:16 pm
As usual, a single small task has exploded into a multiday orgy of activity. I needed a drawing program so that I could make a mood chart, so I did a google search for drawing programs. I ended up at Apple's OS X downloads site and found a totally unexpected treasure trove of software. And since research (and just plain *search*) is what I do, I didn't stop there. I ended up spending over a day and a half tromping around the web looking for new apps. I found some really cool stuff, some of it is even free! (I love oss)

I found an amusing little app called CandyBar that lets you change system icons, Vienna, a great little open source rss feed reader, and my new favorite thing, VoodooPad, a wiki-inspired note-taking app. I am forever finding or thinking of little snippets of info that I want to keep but sticky notes (real or digital) are messy and text editors are too linear and clunky. Apparently other people have this problem too. I found several note-taking apps, but this one, which I am currently using in it's free 'lite' form, is my favorite. I got it off of Software for Starving Students which is a collection of free, primarily open source, software that's available for download as a single disk image. It has some great stuff, including a couple of lovely and interesting astronomy apps and an old friend that I would never have guessed was still in use, POV-Ray. I did a Project Forum (science fair) project with POV-Ray in high school. It was by far the best science fair project I've ever done, at least from the standpoint of enjoyment (sf projects were the bane of my existence). I'm looking forward to playing with it (though I'll have to relearn the description language). Some other good stuff: Journler, a desktop journal (in which I am writing the current entry) which also lets you post individual entries to a blog, Alarm Clock, which uses lets you use iTunes as an alarm, CopyWrite, a writing project manager that's hard to describe but worth looking at.

I love new toys :)
 
 
Current Mood: excitedexcited
 
 
brain_cozy
27 February 2006 @ 07:32 pm
More fun with personality testing.  It's absurd how much I love these things.


#################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### #################################################### ####################################################
Your personality type is RCUEI
You are reserved, calm, unstructured, egocentric, and intellectual, and may prefer a city which matches those traits.

The largest representation of your personality type can be found in the these U.S. cities: Reno, Tucson, New Orleans, Norfolk, Austin, Washington DC, Albuquerque/Santa Fe, Portland/Salem, Greenville/Spartanburg, Minneapolis, Denver, St. Louis and these international countries/regions Iceland, Greece, Argentina, Czech Republic, Belgium, Kazakhstan, Poland, Netherlands, Spain, Croatia, Sweden, Slovenia, Norway, Hungary, Indonesia

What Places In The World Match Your Personality?
City Reviews at CityCulture.org


the Wit
(52% dark, 26% spontaneous, 10% vulgar)
your humor style:
CLEAN | COMPLEX | DARK




You like things edgy, subtle, and smart. I guess that means you're probably an intellectual, but don't take that to mean pretentious. You realize 'dumb' can be witty--after all isn't that the Simpsons' philosophy?--but rudeness for its own sake, 'gross-out' humor and most other things found in a fraternity leave you totally flat.

I guess you just have a more cerebral approach than most. You have the perfect mindset for a joke writer or staff writer.

Your sense of humor takes the most thought to appreciate, but it's also the best, in my opinion.



You probably loved the Office. If you don't know what I'm
talking about, check it out here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/theoffice/.



PEOPLE LIKE YOU: Jon Stewart - Woody Allen - Ricky Gervais







The 3-Variable Funny Test!

- it rules -




If you're interested, try my latest:
The Terrorism Test





My test tracked 3 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 45% on darkness
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 6% on spontaneity
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 1% on vulgarity
Link: The 3 Variable Funny Test written by jason_bateman on Ok Cupid, home of the 32-Type Dating Test


Your brain: 100% interpersonal, 20% visual, 160% verbal, and 120% mathematical!
Congratulations on being 400% smart! Actually, on my test, everyone is. The above score breaks down what kind of thinking you most enjoy doing. A score above 100% means you use that kind of thinking more than average, and a score below 100% means you use it less. It says nothing about how good you are at any one, just how interested you are in each, relatively. A substantial difference in scores between two people means, conclusively, that they are different kinds of thinkers.




Matching Summary: Each of us has different tastes. Still, I offer the following advice, which I think is obvious:


  1. Don't date someone if your interpersonal percentages differ by more than 80%.
  2. Don't be friends with someone if your verbal percentages differ by more than 100%.
  3. Don't have sex with someone if their math percentage is over 200%.




My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 66% on interpersonal
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 2% on visual
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 95% on verbal
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 44% on mathematical
Link: The 4-Variable IQ Test written by chriscoyne on Ok Cupid, home of the 32-Type Dating Test
 
 
brain_cozy
27 February 2006 @ 06:16 pm

Get your own spectral analysis from Area 23®


Ooooo pretty...
 
 
brain_cozy
27 February 2006 @ 05:05 pm
It's been so long since I've even looked at this thing, it's kind of astonishing.  I guess that's what happens when you go *completely insane* for over a year.  Not that the whole completely insane thing is over, yet, but I'm hopeful that I'm on the mend.  Now for the fun part - putting my life back together.

Step 1:  Reapply to school (#&@^#%$!)
Step 2:  Get health/weight under control
Step 3:  Reestablish contact with the human race (family doesn't count)
Step 4:  Finish rebooting brain
Step 5:  Commence productive activity

No problem.  I'll just be whimpering under a rock if you need me.
 
 
Current Mood: contemplativecontemplative
 
 
brain_cozy
05 August 2005 @ 07:33 pm
I was undecided on this one. My absolute favorite was:


You are dignified, spiritual, and wise.
Always unsatisfied, you constantly try to better yourself.
You are also a seeker of knowledge and often buried in books.

You tend to be philosophical, looking for the big picture in life.
You dream of inner peace for yourself, your friends, and the world.
A good friend, you always give of yourself first.



But I also really liked:


You are dependable, popular, and observant.
Deep and thoughtful, you are prone to moodiness.
In fact, your emotions tend to influence everything you do.

You are unique, creative, and expressive.
You don't mind waving your freak flag every once and a while.
And lucky for you, most people find your weird ways charming!



and


You are elegant, withdrawn, and brilliant.
Your mind is a weapon, able to solve any puzzle.
You are also great at poking holes in arguments and common beliefs.

For you, comfort and calm are very important.
You tend to thrive on your own and shrug off most affection.
You prefer to protect your emotions and stay strong.



Hmmm...
 
 
Current Mood: contemplativecontemplative